• Why Do Geologists Love Beer?

    Wired Science heads to the American Geophysical Union's fall meeting in San Francisco to see why geologists -- more than other scientists -- seem to have a burning love affair with beer.

    published: 18 Dec 2009
  • Geological History of America

    Happy Independence Day everyone! Instead of a normal Cambrian Science this week, I decided to do a special video about our ancient heritage! Seriously though. Really, reeaaaallly ancient. Enjoy.

    published: 04 Jul 2013
  • Living Rock An Introduction to Earths Geology

    US Survey series

    published: 03 Jun 2014
  • Ram Setu Unveils 2017 by american geologists and scientist

    Ram setu Rameshwaram latest video

    published: 15 Dec 2017
  • American dad: the truth of geologists.

    Así somos los geólogos, We, the geologist, are clever, handsome, cool...

    published: 20 Dec 2009
  • Geologists the coolest and sexiest men alive

    published: 12 Aug 2012
  • 18 Photos Of The STRANGEST Geological Formations

    From amazing tropical locations, to the deep crack found in Arizona, these are 18 Photos of the STRANGEST Geological Formations ! Subscribe to American Eye http://goo.gl/GBphkv 9. Chimney Rock You might remember this place if you ever played the game called oregon trail. Located at the Chimney Rock National Historic Site, this famous landmark is located in the rather flat state of Nebraska. When Americans began heading west, they used this geological formation as a rendezvous point for fur trading. It’s was often spotted by pioneers along the Oregon trail and if they had made it this far, they knew they was a good chance they’d make it all the way to the prospering gold or silver mines of the west. The pillar is made of Brule clay and layered with ancient volcanic ash and sandstone. The...

    published: 26 Feb 2017
  • Geologists Uncover Evidence of China's Legendary Great Flood | HowStuffWorks NOW

    A team of geologists just might have discovered proof of China's great flood, shifting our understanding and timeline of ancient Chinese history and the founding if its first dynasty. MUSIC: ‘XXV’ by Broke for Free VIDEO CLIPS: [Documentary] Chinas Beginning - Xia Dynasty (2070 - 1600 BC) 夏朝 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qXrkF5Nd4i8 Yangtze River https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1hl5AJF9rY4 Geologists Uncover Evidence of China's Legendary Great Flood | HowStuffWorks NOW https://youtu.be/cocBuqEgvxE

    published: 05 Aug 2016
  • Mount Stuart - From Mexico? | Nick on the Rocks

    The Stuart Range near Leavenworth is one of the most beautiful mountains in all of the American West - and yet its granite contains clues that continue to puzzle geologists. Did the granite really form in Mexico and move a thousand miles north to central Washington?

    published: 19 Jan 2017
  • Earth Science

    http://facebook.com/ScienceReason ... The American Geological Institute (AGI) is a nonprofit federation of 45 geoscientific and professional associations that represents more than 120,000 geologists, geophysicists, and other earth scientists. --- Please SUBSCRIBE to Science & Reason: • http://www.youtube.com/FFreeThinker • http://www.youtube.com/ScienceTV • http://www.youtube.com/Best0fScience • http://www.youtube.com/RationalHumanism --- Founded in 1948, AGI provides information services to geoscientists, serves as a voice of shared interests in our profession, plays a major role in strengthening geoscience education, and strives to increase public awareness of the vital role the geosciences play in society's use of resources, resilience to natural hazards, and the health of the enviro...

    published: 07 Sep 2009
  • Rice geologists study half-billion-year-old 'time capsules' on Texas ranch

    When you look at the cliffs overlooking the Llano River in Central Texas, it’s hard to imagine that they were underwater a half-billion years ago and formed part of the North American coastline during the Upper Cambrian era. But that’s what brought Rice marine geologist André Droxler and his team of researchers to a rare land-based expedition. “I never thought on land you could discover something,” he said. “To discover something in the middle of Texas, it’s pretty exciting.” According to Droxler, the Eagle Ridge Ranch located in Mason County near Fredericksburg has some of the best outcrops in the world containing fossilized prehistoric bacteria and microbes. He believes these microbial reefs contained the first forms of life on Earth. Droxler’s team was granted access to the land...

    published: 03 Aug 2015
  • Yonaguni = "Fake Archaeology"?... and perhaps 'Geology' is fake too!? HERE's HOW!

    TSHIRT DESIGNS! GET YOURS and help me out!! https://shop.spreadshirt.com/ancient-mystery-by-charles-kos/ I put it to the audience that if geologists did more chemistry (a LOT of them have chemistry background), they would see things differently. What's the correct method of continental formation? We suggest chemical crystallisation! For example, the Himalaya have been used as an argument against expanding earth. But how about a dynamic earth which shrinks as well? How about Crystalline Continents? How about Continental shelfs being CRYSTALLINE EDGES, and not formed by pressure or folding or volcanism as current geology suggests? Continents formed SPONTANEOUSLY via crystallisation when a solution containing liquid rock hits a pressure differential (the surface!) How about the Earth contai...

    published: 07 Mar 2018
  • Tom Ewing- Texas Geologic History Quick Overview

    Dr. Tom Ewing, consultant to the Texas Bureau of Economic Geology explains Texas geologic history from the Pre-Cambrian to the present in a quick over view using diagrams and global reconstructions. This talk was presented to the Houston Geological Society September 30, 2015. For more information check out the BEG Texas Through Time website at http://www.beg.utexas.edu/GeoTX

    published: 22 Jan 2016
  • Big Bend Geology: The Primeval Puzzle - Texas Parks and Wildlife [Official]

    The Primeval Puzzle Geologists estimate that the earth is at least 4.5 billion years old. Fragments of that distant past dominate the landscape at Big Bend Ranch State Park, a place shaped and scarred by eons of geologic havoc. Travel with Kevin Urbanczyk of Sul Ross State University and some of his students and learn how shifting continents, volcanoes, faulting and erosion have all played a role in the formation of the park's natural features.

    published: 05 Mar 2014
  • Solving a Geological Puzzle in Guatemala

    In November 2010, Museum Curator George E. Harlow embarked on a Constantine S. Niarchos Expedition to the Montagua Valley in central Guatemala, a fault zone rich in the precious mineral, jadeite jade. Dr. Harlow and his team of geologists hiked along riverbeds and steep outcrops, collecting rock samples that might provide clues to the evolution of the Caribbean region. The Caribbean originated 120 million years ago, when areas of volcanic islands and ocean floor squeezed past Mexico and South America. In what's known as the Guatemala suture zone, the boundary between the North American and Caribbean tectonic plates, geologists have found remnants of both a plate collision and a subduction zone, where an oceanic plate plunged into Earth's mantle. The high pressures of subduction zones help...

    published: 14 Jun 2013
  • Living The Mining Dream - Susan Flasha (Senior Project Geologist)

    Organization: Pretium Resources Inc.

    published: 29 Jan 2015
  • Mike Murphy, President, Student Chapter of American Association of Petroleum Geologists

    published: 15 May 2012
  • "Mid-Continental Geology," by William Gilliland.

    Big Muddy Speakers Series (Kansas City) hosted by Healthy Rivers Partnership (http://www.healthyriverspartnership.com/) in cooperation with Missouri River Relief and Friends of Lakeside Nature Center at the Westport Coffeehouse Theater (http://www.westportcoffeehouse.com) - Tuesday, June 22, 2015. Biography: William Gilliland William Gilliland is an Adjunct Assistant Professor in Geology, teaching Kansas Historical Geology. He is a Licensed Geologist in the States of Kansas & Arkansas. He has worked for 35 years in Kansas as a geologist in a variety of fields. He is currently an Environmental Scientist Division Of Water Resources, Kansas Department of Agriculture. He writes "Throughout my professional career, I have been interested in the interaction between the people of the State of K...

    published: 25 Sep 2015
  • Where Terranes Collide: The Geology of Western Canada

    The video is about the geology and the geologists of the Canadian Cordillera. The current concepts concerning the origin of the mountains of western Canada and the geologists and geoscientists who work among them are featured. Source: Geological Survey of Canada, Educational Video Series NR92017VE, 1993; 25:30 min Publisher: Natural Resources Canada / Ressources naturelles Canada. Further information can be found at the following URL: http://geoscan.ess.nrcan.gc.ca/starweb/geoscan/servlet.starweb?path=geoscan/geoscanfastlink_e.web&search1=R=205041

    published: 28 Apr 2015
  • Geology of Giant Petroleum Fields American Association of Petroleum Geologists, Memoir 14

    published: 18 Jun 2017
  • Geologists Vs Physicist, a philosophical view

    Physics is about what man says on nature, geology is about what nature says to us Victor R. Baker (Ph.D., University of Colorado, 1971) is a former President of the Geological Society of America. He is now professor at Univ. of Arizona researching in Paleo-hydrology and Geomorphology. He builds bridges between public policy, the environment, and philosophy of science. Vic received the Distinguished Career Award from the American Geological Society's Quaternary Geology and Geomorphology Division and the David Linton Award of the British Society for Geomorphology. He has published 18 books, 400 scientific papers and his work on the Channeled Scabland has been featured in TV documentaries, as the PBS NOVA production “Mystery of the Megaflood”: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gC_vv0K4yTY ...

    published: 11 Jul 2015
  • Most Amazing Impact Craters in South America

    Thanks for watching... 1. Araguainha Brazil 40 km 2. Campo del Cielo Argentina 0.05 km 3. Monturaqui Chile 0.46 km 4. Riachão Ring Brazil 4.5 km 5. Rio Cuarto Argentina 4.5 km (largest of 10) 6. Serra da Cangalha Brazil 12 km 7. Vargeão Dome Brazil 12 km 8. Vista Alegre Brazil 9.5 km 9. Iturralde Bolivia 8 km Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_impact_craters_in_South_America An impact crater is an approximately circular depression in the surface of a planet, moon or other solid body in the Solar System, formed by the hypervelocity impact of a smaller body with the surface. In contrast to volcanic craters, which result from explosion or internal collapse, impact craters typically have raised rims and floors that are lower in elevation than th...

    published: 06 Sep 2014
  • How to Pronounce geologists - American English

    Learn how to say/pronounce geologists in American English. Subscribe for more videos!

    published: 31 Jan 2018
  • Funny geologists on drilling rig

    published: 22 Dec 2013
developed with YouTube
Why Do Geologists Love Beer?
3:37

Why Do Geologists Love Beer?

  • Order:
  • Duration: 3:37
  • Updated: 18 Dec 2009
  • views: 53225
videos
Wired Science heads to the American Geophysical Union's fall meeting in San Francisco to see why geologists -- more than other scientists -- seem to have a burning love affair with beer.
https://wn.com/Why_Do_Geologists_Love_Beer
Geological History of America
3:16

Geological History of America

  • Order:
  • Duration: 3:16
  • Updated: 04 Jul 2013
  • views: 4516
videos
Happy Independence Day everyone! Instead of a normal Cambrian Science this week, I decided to do a special video about our ancient heritage! Seriously though. Really, reeaaaallly ancient. Enjoy.
https://wn.com/Geological_History_Of_America
Living Rock An Introduction to Earths Geology
57:06

Living Rock An Introduction to Earths Geology

  • Order:
  • Duration: 57:06
  • Updated: 03 Jun 2014
  • views: 155711
videos
US Survey series
https://wn.com/Living_Rock_An_Introduction_To_Earths_Geology
Ram Setu Unveils 2017 by american geologists and scientist
2:26

Ram Setu Unveils 2017 by american geologists and scientist

  • Order:
  • Duration: 2:26
  • Updated: 15 Dec 2017
  • views: 63
videos
Ram setu Rameshwaram latest video
https://wn.com/Ram_Setu_Unveils_2017_By_American_Geologists_And_Scientist
American dad: the truth of geologists.
0:50

American dad: the truth of geologists.

  • Order:
  • Duration: 0:50
  • Updated: 20 Dec 2009
  • views: 3299
videos
Así somos los geólogos, We, the geologist, are clever, handsome, cool...
https://wn.com/American_Dad_The_Truth_Of_Geologists.
Geologists the coolest and sexiest men alive
0:21

Geologists the coolest and sexiest men alive

  • Order:
  • Duration: 0:21
  • Updated: 12 Aug 2012
  • views: 94215
videos
https://wn.com/Geologists_The_Coolest_And_Sexiest_Men_Alive
18 Photos Of The STRANGEST Geological Formations
8:31

18 Photos Of The STRANGEST Geological Formations

  • Order:
  • Duration: 8:31
  • Updated: 26 Feb 2017
  • views: 337981
videos
From amazing tropical locations, to the deep crack found in Arizona, these are 18 Photos of the STRANGEST Geological Formations ! Subscribe to American Eye http://goo.gl/GBphkv 9. Chimney Rock You might remember this place if you ever played the game called oregon trail. Located at the Chimney Rock National Historic Site, this famous landmark is located in the rather flat state of Nebraska. When Americans began heading west, they used this geological formation as a rendezvous point for fur trading. It’s was often spotted by pioneers along the Oregon trail and if they had made it this far, they knew they was a good chance they’d make it all the way to the prospering gold or silver mines of the west. The pillar is made of Brule clay and layered with ancient volcanic ash and sandstone. The chimney tower at the top, consists of stronger sandstone which has allowed it to stand upright. 8. Wave Rock Woah, surf's up in Australia and it looks like this huge wave is about to make this lady here wipe out! The 47 footer is found in hyden, Australia about 300 kilometres east of Perth. This wave is 350 feet long and made of Monzogranite. The photographer certainly took this photo from an amazing angle and it looks like it’s seriously about to crash any moment! 7. Bryce Canyon Rock Formations This photo that we see taken in Bryce Canyon located in Utah, is geologists call Hoodoo. They’re large pinnacle formations made of sedimentary rock that can reach up to 200 feet. Although Bryce Canyon, technically isn’t a canyon, tourists love coming to this national park for hiking, recreation and experiencing this strange rock formations in person. This photo captures carefully the different shades of coloring that the hoodoos give off. 6. Hanging Rock, Australia If you’re afraid of heights, you certainly don’t want to stand on the edge of this crazy rtock formation located in new south wales. The cliff reaches about 330 feet high. This giant block of sandstone has become a popular location for daring rock climbers but you have to imagine the view from the top is pretty insane! 5. Drangarnir, Faroe Islands Located in the isolated faroe islands, these sea stacks form in the Atlantic ocean and form an arch with striking beauty as you can tell from this photo. Arches like these found along the coastline, can be formed over a long period of time due to intense wave crashes hitting, weaker areas of stones. The waters can also erode the weaker parts of the rock, but this example in the Faroe islands is quite unique and stunning. 4. Located in the outback of Australia, it seems like this stone was some kind of watermelon chopped in half by some kind of giant with a samurai sword! The man here in the photo, must truly understand the bizarre, uniqueness to a rock formation such as this. It’s believed that the huge changes in temperature during night and day at this location caused the rock to expand and contract, eventually leading to it being broken in half. Some rocks and minerals when they’re separated have a much more smooth cleavage, such as this. 3. Strange Crack, Mexico Incredible photos were taken of a strange crack that runs east and west in the mexico desert. It stretches over kilometer long and is about 8 meters deep! The crevice has forced drivers and farm workers to work around it or risk falling down! Many were really unsure exactly what caused the surface of the earth to simply crack open like that but they believe it was mostly likely caused by an earthquake from the San Andreas fault. But what’s strange about that theory is that the San Andreas fault runs North and South. So it’s an unusual case nonetheless. 2. Valle De Luna, Bolivia Also known as the valley of the moon in English, this crazy place is found in bolivia. This is area that’s been wore away by erosion but from this photo you can tell that older things are beautiful as well. The unique clay erosion patterns are like something from out of this world and possibly on the moon! Be careful when hiking here since the rocks can get pretty jagged! James Bond Island :D This crazy looking rock almost seems as though it’s completely photoshopped but it’s not! A huge limestone pillar juts out from the sea and creates a huge tourist attraction! It’s located in Thailand and many are drawn by it’s beauty and mystery. The limestone tower reaches 66 feet high
https://wn.com/18_Photos_Of_The_Strangest_Geological_Formations
Geologists Uncover Evidence of China's Legendary Great Flood | HowStuffWorks NOW
2:48

Geologists Uncover Evidence of China's Legendary Great Flood | HowStuffWorks NOW

  • Order:
  • Duration: 2:48
  • Updated: 05 Aug 2016
  • views: 8008
videos
A team of geologists just might have discovered proof of China's great flood, shifting our understanding and timeline of ancient Chinese history and the founding if its first dynasty. MUSIC: ‘XXV’ by Broke for Free VIDEO CLIPS: [Documentary] Chinas Beginning - Xia Dynasty (2070 - 1600 BC) 夏朝 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qXrkF5Nd4i8 Yangtze River https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1hl5AJF9rY4 Geologists Uncover Evidence of China's Legendary Great Flood | HowStuffWorks NOW https://youtu.be/cocBuqEgvxE
https://wn.com/Geologists_Uncover_Evidence_Of_China's_Legendary_Great_Flood_|_Howstuffworks_Now
Mount Stuart - From Mexico? | Nick on the Rocks
5:11

Mount Stuart - From Mexico? | Nick on the Rocks

  • Order:
  • Duration: 5:11
  • Updated: 19 Jan 2017
  • views: 1995
videos
The Stuart Range near Leavenworth is one of the most beautiful mountains in all of the American West - and yet its granite contains clues that continue to puzzle geologists. Did the granite really form in Mexico and move a thousand miles north to central Washington?
https://wn.com/Mount_Stuart_From_Mexico_|_Nick_On_The_Rocks
Earth Science
6:37

Earth Science

  • Order:
  • Duration: 6:37
  • Updated: 07 Sep 2009
  • views: 204307
videos
http://facebook.com/ScienceReason ... The American Geological Institute (AGI) is a nonprofit federation of 45 geoscientific and professional associations that represents more than 120,000 geologists, geophysicists, and other earth scientists. --- Please SUBSCRIBE to Science & Reason: • http://www.youtube.com/FFreeThinker • http://www.youtube.com/ScienceTV • http://www.youtube.com/Best0fScience • http://www.youtube.com/RationalHumanism --- Founded in 1948, AGI provides information services to geoscientists, serves as a voice of shared interests in our profession, plays a major role in strengthening geoscience education, and strives to increase public awareness of the vital role the geosciences play in society's use of resources, resilience to natural hazards, and the health of the environment. • http://www.agiweb.org/ --- Earth science (also known as geoscience, the geosciences or the Earth sciences), is an all-embracing term for the sciences related to the planet Earth. It is arguably a special case in planetary science, the Earth being the only known life-bearing planet. There are both reductionist and holistic approaches to Earth science. There are four major disciplines in earth sciences, namely geography, geology, geophysics and geodesy. These major disciplines use physics, chemistry, biology, chronology and mathematics to build a quantitative understanding of the principal areas or spheres of the Earth system. The following fields of science are generally categorized within the geosciences: - Geology describes the rocky parts of the Earth's crust (or lithosphere) and its historic development. Major subdisciplines are mineralogy and petrology, geochemistry, geomorphology, paleontology, stratigraphy, structural geology, engineering geology and sedimentology. - Geophysics and Geodesy investigate the figure of the Earth, its reaction to forces and its magnetic and gravity fields. Geophysicists explore the Earth's core and mantle as well as the tectonic and seismic activity of the lithosphere. - Soil science covers the outermost layer of the Earth's crust that is subject to soil formation processes (or pedosphere). Major subdisciplines include edaphology and pedology. - Oceanography and hydrology (includes limnology) describe the marine and freshwater domains of the watery parts of the Earth (or hydrosphere). Major subdisciplines include hydrogeology and physical, chemical, and biological oceanography. - Glaciology covers the icy parts of the Earth (or cryosphere). - Atmospheric sciences cover the gaseous parts of the Earth (or atmosphere) between the surface and the exosphere (about 1000 km). Major subdisciplines are meteorology, climatology, atmospheric chemistry and atmospheric physics. - A very important linking sphere is the biosphere, the study of which is biology. The biosphere consists of all forms of life, from single-celled organisms to pine trees to people. The interactions of Earth's other spheres - lithosphere/geosphere, hydrosphere, atmosphere and/or cryosphere and pedosphere - create the conditions that can support life. • http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Earth_science .
https://wn.com/Earth_Science
Rice geologists study half-billion-year-old 'time capsules' on Texas ranch
9:05

Rice geologists study half-billion-year-old 'time capsules' on Texas ranch

  • Order:
  • Duration: 9:05
  • Updated: 03 Aug 2015
  • views: 4973
videos
When you look at the cliffs overlooking the Llano River in Central Texas, it’s hard to imagine that they were underwater a half-billion years ago and formed part of the North American coastline during the Upper Cambrian era. But that’s what brought Rice marine geologist André Droxler and his team of researchers to a rare land-based expedition. “I never thought on land you could discover something,” he said. “To discover something in the middle of Texas, it’s pretty exciting.” According to Droxler, the Eagle Ridge Ranch located in Mason County near Fredericksburg has some of the best outcrops in the world containing fossilized prehistoric bacteria and microbes. He believes these microbial reefs contained the first forms of life on Earth. Droxler’s team was granted access to the land after working with Woodlands resident Donald Shepard and his wife, Rose, who own the ranch. The professor of Earth science also secured funding from four major oil companies that had interest in the research on microbial reefs. Since 2012 the Rice professor and graduate students have made many trips to Mason County, drilled more than 150 core samples and virtually mapped the area using a drone. Droxler said the three summers here “have been some of the happiest summers I have had in my life,” and he returns with the same excitement as the first time he paddled down the Llano River in search of half-billion-year-old “time capsules.”
https://wn.com/Rice_Geologists_Study_Half_Billion_Year_Old_'Time_Capsules'_On_Texas_Ranch
Yonaguni = "Fake Archaeology"?... and perhaps 'Geology' is fake too!? HERE's HOW!
12:00

Yonaguni = "Fake Archaeology"?... and perhaps 'Geology' is fake too!? HERE's HOW!

  • Order:
  • Duration: 12:00
  • Updated: 07 Mar 2018
  • views: 7188
videos
TSHIRT DESIGNS! GET YOURS and help me out!! https://shop.spreadshirt.com/ancient-mystery-by-charles-kos/ I put it to the audience that if geologists did more chemistry (a LOT of them have chemistry background), they would see things differently. What's the correct method of continental formation? We suggest chemical crystallisation! For example, the Himalaya have been used as an argument against expanding earth. But how about a dynamic earth which shrinks as well? How about Crystalline Continents? How about Continental shelfs being CRYSTALLINE EDGES, and not formed by pressure or folding or volcanism as current geology suggests? Continents formed SPONTANEOUSLY via crystallisation when a solution containing liquid rock hits a pressure differential (the surface!) How about the Earth containing a catastrophically unstable BROWN DWARF?! Sure there might be some folding at the continental shelves, but why confuse this with FORMATION? In fact crystals had no choice but to pop out of solution as soon as they hit the atmosphere layer! BASIC Chemistry but geologists are not always chemists! Hope you enjoy this video! WOOOOHOOOOO! And as always thanks for watching! Anyway, my new book is now out. Here is a US link. https://www.amazon.com/Confessions-Gods-Nuclear-Anunnaki-Nephilim/dp/0987420836/ There is also a UK link! https://www.amazon.co.uk/Confessions-Gods-Nuclear-Anunnaki-Nephilim/dp/0987420836/ * Connect with me: Guess what I got T-shirts (MERCH FINALLY!) https://shop.spreadshirt.com.au/CharlesKos/ Support this channel! https://www.patreon.com/charleskos New MAIN SITE: http://www.charleskos.com/ Book https://www.amazon.com/Search-Origin-Pyramids-Lost-Gods/dp/0987420828/ Old School Website http://charles.kos.id.au/ FACEBOOK OFFICIAL: https://www.facebook.com/CharlesKosPhD/ Videos collected together http://www.whatisgiza.com/
https://wn.com/Yonaguni_Fake_Archaeology_..._And_Perhaps_'Geology'_Is_Fake_Too_Here's_How
Tom Ewing- Texas Geologic History Quick Overview
24:44

Tom Ewing- Texas Geologic History Quick Overview

  • Order:
  • Duration: 24:44
  • Updated: 22 Jan 2016
  • views: 4093
videos
Dr. Tom Ewing, consultant to the Texas Bureau of Economic Geology explains Texas geologic history from the Pre-Cambrian to the present in a quick over view using diagrams and global reconstructions. This talk was presented to the Houston Geological Society September 30, 2015. For more information check out the BEG Texas Through Time website at http://www.beg.utexas.edu/GeoTX
https://wn.com/Tom_Ewing_Texas_Geologic_History_Quick_Overview
Big Bend Geology: The Primeval Puzzle - Texas Parks and Wildlife [Official]
8:55

Big Bend Geology: The Primeval Puzzle - Texas Parks and Wildlife [Official]

  • Order:
  • Duration: 8:55
  • Updated: 05 Mar 2014
  • views: 17567
videos
The Primeval Puzzle Geologists estimate that the earth is at least 4.5 billion years old. Fragments of that distant past dominate the landscape at Big Bend Ranch State Park, a place shaped and scarred by eons of geologic havoc. Travel with Kevin Urbanczyk of Sul Ross State University and some of his students and learn how shifting continents, volcanoes, faulting and erosion have all played a role in the formation of the park's natural features.
https://wn.com/Big_Bend_Geology_The_Primeval_Puzzle_Texas_Parks_And_Wildlife_Official
Solving a Geological Puzzle in Guatemala
5:37

Solving a Geological Puzzle in Guatemala

  • Order:
  • Duration: 5:37
  • Updated: 14 Jun 2013
  • views: 4229
videos
In November 2010, Museum Curator George E. Harlow embarked on a Constantine S. Niarchos Expedition to the Montagua Valley in central Guatemala, a fault zone rich in the precious mineral, jadeite jade. Dr. Harlow and his team of geologists hiked along riverbeds and steep outcrops, collecting rock samples that might provide clues to the evolution of the Caribbean region. The Caribbean originated 120 million years ago, when areas of volcanic islands and ocean floor squeezed past Mexico and South America. In what's known as the Guatemala suture zone, the boundary between the North American and Caribbean tectonic plates, geologists have found remnants of both a plate collision and a subduction zone, where an oceanic plate plunged into Earth's mantle. The high pressures of subduction zones help form minerals like jadeite and its host rock, serpentinite. By following the trail of jade in this region, Dr. Harlow and his team are gaining an understanding of the subduction and collisions that occurred throughout the history of Caribbean plate tectonics. During the expedition, the team studied an ophiolite--a piece of sea floor crust emplaced on top of the continent that had not previously been recorded on geological maps. Back at the Museum, Dr. Harlow's team, including Dr. Kennet Flores, a Davis Postdoctoral Scholar in the Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences, is conducting geochemical studies of the rock samples gathered during the expedition. Dr. Harlow anticipates that the results will provide insight into the geological puzzle of Guatemala and open windows for research in other parts of the world. George Harlow's Constantine S. Niarchos Expedition was generously supported by the Stavros Niarchos Foundation. The research described in this video has been supported in part by the National Science Foundation (NSF) under grant numbers EAR0309116 and EAR1119403. VIDEO CREDITS: MUSIC "Dazed" by Airtone ILLUSTRATIONS AND MAPS AMNH/E. Chapman Kennet E. Flores George E. Harlow Robert Stern VIDEO: AMNH/J. Bauerle Jamie Newman
https://wn.com/Solving_A_Geological_Puzzle_In_Guatemala
Living The Mining Dream - Susan Flasha (Senior Project Geologist)
6:12

Living The Mining Dream - Susan Flasha (Senior Project Geologist)

  • Order:
  • Duration: 6:12
  • Updated: 29 Jan 2015
  • views: 4653
videos
Organization: Pretium Resources Inc.
https://wn.com/Living_The_Mining_Dream_Susan_Flasha_(Senior_Project_Geologist)
Mike Murphy, President, Student Chapter of American Association of Petroleum Geologists
0:22

Mike Murphy, President, Student Chapter of American Association of Petroleum Geologists

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  • Duration: 0:22
  • Updated: 15 May 2012
  • views: 49
videos
https://wn.com/Mike_Murphy,_President,_Student_Chapter_Of_American_Association_Of_Petroleum_Geologists
"Mid-Continental Geology," by William Gilliland.
37:05

"Mid-Continental Geology," by William Gilliland.

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  • Duration: 37:05
  • Updated: 25 Sep 2015
  • views: 1333
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Big Muddy Speakers Series (Kansas City) hosted by Healthy Rivers Partnership (http://www.healthyriverspartnership.com/) in cooperation with Missouri River Relief and Friends of Lakeside Nature Center at the Westport Coffeehouse Theater (http://www.westportcoffeehouse.com) - Tuesday, June 22, 2015. Biography: William Gilliland William Gilliland is an Adjunct Assistant Professor in Geology, teaching Kansas Historical Geology. He is a Licensed Geologist in the States of Kansas & Arkansas. He has worked for 35 years in Kansas as a geologist in a variety of fields. He is currently an Environmental Scientist Division Of Water Resources, Kansas Department of Agriculture. He writes "Throughout my professional career, I have been interested in the interaction between the people of the State of Kansas and the land that they have settled. As a part of the Kansas Studies Center, I will have an opportunity to share with students how geology has developed and shaped the land that became Kansas, and how plants, animals and humans have utilized it." Email: will.gilliland@washburn.edu American Institute of Professional Geologists Presidential Certificate of Merit William J. Gilliland, 1987 Videography by Kansas City Digital Video. Index of the Big Muddy Speakers Series: http://www.kcdv.tv/big-muddy-speakers-series Upcoming Presentations http://bigmuddyspeakers.org/kansascity/
https://wn.com/Mid_Continental_Geology,_By_William_Gilliland.
Where Terranes Collide: The Geology of Western Canada
25:31

Where Terranes Collide: The Geology of Western Canada

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  • Duration: 25:31
  • Updated: 28 Apr 2015
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The video is about the geology and the geologists of the Canadian Cordillera. The current concepts concerning the origin of the mountains of western Canada and the geologists and geoscientists who work among them are featured. Source: Geological Survey of Canada, Educational Video Series NR92017VE, 1993; 25:30 min Publisher: Natural Resources Canada / Ressources naturelles Canada. Further information can be found at the following URL: http://geoscan.ess.nrcan.gc.ca/starweb/geoscan/servlet.starweb?path=geoscan/geoscanfastlink_e.web&search1=R=205041
https://wn.com/Where_Terranes_Collide_The_Geology_Of_Western_Canada
Geology of Giant Petroleum Fields American Association of Petroleum Geologists, Memoir 14
0:44

Geology of Giant Petroleum Fields American Association of Petroleum Geologists, Memoir 14

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  • Duration: 0:44
  • Updated: 18 Jun 2017
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https://wn.com/Geology_Of_Giant_Petroleum_Fields_American_Association_Of_Petroleum_Geologists,_Memoir_14
Geologists Vs Physicist, a philosophical view
4:42

Geologists Vs Physicist, a philosophical view

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  • Duration: 4:42
  • Updated: 11 Jul 2015
  • views: 740
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Physics is about what man says on nature, geology is about what nature says to us Victor R. Baker (Ph.D., University of Colorado, 1971) is a former President of the Geological Society of America. He is now professor at Univ. of Arizona researching in Paleo-hydrology and Geomorphology. He builds bridges between public policy, the environment, and philosophy of science. Vic received the Distinguished Career Award from the American Geological Society's Quaternary Geology and Geomorphology Division and the David Linton Award of the British Society for Geomorphology. He has published 18 books, 400 scientific papers and his work on the Channeled Scabland has been featured in TV documentaries, as the PBS NOVA production “Mystery of the Megaflood”: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gC_vv0K4yTY More about Vic here: http://www.hwr.arizona.edu/users/baker Other videos with Vic: Geologists and Philosophy _______https://youtu.be/oZkOO8Zkn8k Geology Vs Philosophy__________ https://youtu.be/mQcxrrwaBI0 How scientists work______________ https://youtu.be/Juv3fh6Ywwc On the philosophy of the past _____ http://youtu.be/eh9N8R1fcPA Why good geologists are senior ____http://youtu.be/_QhnpEhwnMQ Suggestions _______________________http://youtu.be/hncYCg06n-c See THE SPEAKERS I have interviewed in this playlist: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCoJlkm0iPZmptz0-tVROLDw/playlists This video is part of MINIGEOLOGY.COM a channel where I interview bright geologists to uncover their mindset and discover how they approach a problem, their work, life: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCoJlkm0iPZmptz0-tVROLDw SUBSCRIBE to be updated on the next interview
https://wn.com/Geologists_Vs_Physicist,_A_Philosophical_View
Most Amazing Impact Craters in South America
1:03

Most Amazing Impact Craters in South America

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  • Duration: 1:03
  • Updated: 06 Sep 2014
  • views: 1043
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Thanks for watching... 1. Araguainha Brazil 40 km 2. Campo del Cielo Argentina 0.05 km 3. Monturaqui Chile 0.46 km 4. Riachão Ring Brazil 4.5 km 5. Rio Cuarto Argentina 4.5 km (largest of 10) 6. Serra da Cangalha Brazil 12 km 7. Vargeão Dome Brazil 12 km 8. Vista Alegre Brazil 9.5 km 9. Iturralde Bolivia 8 km Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_impact_craters_in_South_America An impact crater is an approximately circular depression in the surface of a planet, moon or other solid body in the Solar System, formed by the hypervelocity impact of a smaller body with the surface. In contrast to volcanic craters, which result from explosion or internal collapse, impact craters typically have raised rims and floors that are lower in elevation than the surrounding terrain. Impact craters range from small, simple, bowl-shaped depressions to large, complex, multi-ringed impact basins. Meteor Crater is perhaps the best-known example of a small impact crater on the Earth. Impact craters are the dominant geographic features on many solid Solar System objects including the Moon, Mercury, Callisto, Ganymede and most small moons and asteroids. On other planets and moons that experience more active surface geological processes, such as Earth, Venus, Mars, Europa, Io and Titan, visible impact craters are less common because they become eroded, buried or transformed by tectonics over time. Where such processes have destroyed most of the original crater topography, the terms impact structure or astrobleme are more commonly used. In early literature, before the significance of impact cratering was widely recognised, the terms cryptoexplosion or cryptovolcanic structure were often used to describe what are now recognised as impact-related features on Earth. The cratering records of very old surfaces, such as Mercury, the Moon, and the southern highlands of Mars, record a period of intense early bombardment in the inner Solar System around 3.9 billion years ago. Since that time, the rate of crater production on Earth has been considerably lower, but it is appreciable nonetheless; Earth experiences from one to three impacts large enough to produce a 20 km diameter crater about once every million years on average. This indicates that there should be far more relatively young craters on the planet than have been discovered so far. The cratering rate in the inner solar system fluctuates as a consequence of collisions in the asteroid belt that create a family of fragments that are often sent cascading into the inner solar system. Formed in a collision 160 million years ago, the Baptistina family of asteroids is thought to have caused a large spike in the impact rate, perhaps causing the Chicxulub impact that may have triggered the extinction of the dinosaurs 66 million years ago. Note that the rate of impact cratering in the outer Solar System could be different from the inner Solar System. Although the Earth’s active surface processes quickly destroy the impact record, about 170 terrestrial impact craters have been identified. These range in diameter from a few tens of meters up to about 300 km, and they range in age from recent times (e.g. the Sikhote-Alin craters in Russia whose creation were witnessed in 1947) to more than two billion years, though most are less than 500 million years old because geological processes tend to obliterate older craters. They are also selectively found in the stable interior regions of continents. Few undersea craters have been discovered because of the difficulty of surveying the sea floor, the rapid rate of change of the ocean bottom, and the subduction of the ocean floor into the Earth's interior by processes of plate tectonics. Impact craters are not to be confused with landforms that in some cases appear similar, including calderas and ring dikes. Daniel Barringer (1860–1929) was one of the first to identify an impact crater, Meteor Crater in Arizona; to crater specialists the site is referred to as Barringer Crater in his honor. Initially Barringer's ideas were not widely accepted, and even when the origin of Meteor Crater was finally acknowledged, the wider implications for impact cratering as a significant geological process on Earth were not. In the 1920s, the American geologist Walter H. Bucher studied a number of sites now recognized as impact craters in the USA. He concluded they had been created by some great explosive event, but believed that this force was probably volcanic in origin. However, in 1936, the geologists John D. Boon and Claude C. Albritton Jr. revisited Bucher's studies and concluded that the craters that he studied were probably formed by impacts. Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Impact_crater
https://wn.com/Most_Amazing_Impact_Craters_In_South_America
How to Pronounce geologists - American English
0:10

How to Pronounce geologists - American English

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  • Duration: 0:10
  • Updated: 31 Jan 2018
  • views: 3
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Learn how to say/pronounce geologists in American English. Subscribe for more videos!
https://wn.com/How_To_Pronounce_Geologists_American_English
Funny geologists on drilling rig
0:42

Funny geologists on drilling rig

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  • Duration: 0:42
  • Updated: 22 Dec 2013
  • views: 4537
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https://wn.com/Funny_Geologists_On_Drilling_Rig
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